Untitled Document

Georgia State Football Timeline
Why is Georgia State starting a football program?
Why will Georgia State football be a success?
How was this decision arrived upon?
What other steps had to be taken to reach this point?
When will Georgia State actually begin playing football?
At what level will Georgia State football compete?
Will it be scholarship or non-scholarship football?
Where will the team play?
What other facilities are necessary?
How will the football program be financed?
How much money has been raised?
Will the football program be self-sustaining?
Will the football program be self-sustaining?
What other sports will Georgia State add along with football?


Georgia State Football Timeline

April 17, 2008 - Football Program Officially Launched

June 12, 2008 - Bill Curry Named Georgia State's First Head Coach

July, 2008 - Assistant Coaches Hired

February, 2009 - Georgia State Signs Its First Recruiting Class

Fall, 2009 - Georgia State's First Class Enrolls, Begins Practice

Fall, 2010 - GEORGIA STATE FOOTBALL KICKS OFF

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Why is Georgia State starting a football program?

The addition of football is in the best interests of Georgia State University and is consistent with the University’s strategic goals. Beginning with President Carl Patton, the University leadership believes that an intercollegiate football program will be a catalyst for continued growth and will enhance the overall college experience for the students of Georgia State. It will also help engage the more than 100,000 Georgia State alumni in the Atlanta area and give them another reason to stay connected to their alma mater.


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Why will Georgia State football be a success?

There is no question that building a football program from scratch is a tremendous challenge, but it’s also an exciting opportunity because Georgia State has many inherent advantages. The quality and popularity of high school football in the Atlanta area and the state of Georgia offers a tremendous recruiting base. Many players are currently leaving the area to play for other Football Championship Subdivision schools such as Appalachian State and Furman.

Georgia State has a broad-based curriculum and a student body of more than 28,000, many of whom are now living on campus and excited about the prospect of a Panthers football team.

Georgia State’s conference, the Colonial Athletic Association, sponsors football and is the top conference in FCS. The CAA placed a record five teams in the 2007 NCAA Playoffs, including national runner-up Delaware and semifinalist Richmond. CAA teams have reached the NCAA title game in four of the last five years, including NCAA championships by Delaware in 2003 and James Madison in 2004.

We believe that these factors give Georgia State a chance to build a competitive program that will help build identity and exposure for the University while engaging a growing student population and a large local alumni base.

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How was this decision arrived upon?

The idea of starting football at Georgia State has been discussed on various levels for a number of years. The latest campaign gained momentum with Georgia State’s move to the Colonial Athletic Association in 2005. An exhaustive feasibility study on the addition of football was commissioned by President Carl Patton and Director of Athletics Mary McElroy and was completed in November of 2006. From there, the University held several Town Hall Meetings to gauge interest, all with very positive results. In April of 2007, former National Football League player and coach Dan Reeves was hired as Georgia State’s Football Consultant. All along the way, the idea of football at Georgia State has generated enthusiasm and support from Georgia State students, faculty, alumni and supporters, as well as from the Atlanta community as a whole.

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What other steps had to be taken to reach this point?

Last fall, Georgia State University’s Mandatory Student Fee Committee voted unanimously to approve an increase in the student athletic fee. That measure was endorsed by the University’s Financial Advisory Committee to the President and then forwarded by President Carl Patton to the Board of Regents for vote at its April 15-16, meeting. The Board of Regents approved an increase of $85 per semester

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When will Georgia State actually begin playing football?

Georgia State will field its first intercollegiate team in the fall of 2010.

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At what level will Georgia State football compete?

Georgia State will compete at the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS, formerly known as NCAA Division I-AA). The Panthers will begin playing in the Colonial Athletic Association, the top FCS conference in the nation, in 2012.

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Will it be scholarship or non-scholarship football?

Georgia State will play scholarship football. NCAA rules allow for 63 scholarships at the Football Championship Subdivision level. Current plans are to award up to 30 scholarships in 2009 and then as many as 60 scholarships in 2010 before reaching the full complement of 63 scholarships in 2011.

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Where will the team play?

Current plans call for Georgia State to play its games in the Georgia Dome. We are fortunate to have such an outstanding facility located so close to campus and able to accommodate Georgia State football.

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What other facilities are necessary?

Georgia State is currently investigating options for practice. Additional space must be identified for coaches’ offices and meeting rooms, either at the practice facility or on campus adjacent to our current athletics facilities. Current facilities for strength and conditioning, athletic training and academic support must be expanded, or new areas constructed, to accommodate the addition of more than 100 student-athletes in football and women's sports.

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How will the football program be financed?

The student fee increase approved by the Board of Regents on April 15 will generate an additional $5.5 million per year, a figure that will increase as enrollment grows. Those monies will go toward annual operating costs for football and additional women’s sports, including scholarships, personnel, equipment and travel. Additionally, we look to continue to grow annual giving, corporate sponsorship and gate revenues to help fund operating costs.

We are pursuing private donations to assist with capital costs, primarily for the construction of the practice facility, with a goal of raising $7-9 million.

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How much money has been raised?

After launching our fund-raising campaign last spring, approximately $1.1 million in pledges were raised in the first four months. That met our initial of goal or raising $1 million before the Georgia State Student Committee’s vote on the increase in student fees. Now that we have officially announced the start of the football program, we will resume aggressive fund-raising efforts.

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Will the football program be self-sustaining?

Generally football programs on the Football Championship Subdivision level, and even most programs at the Football Bowl Subdivision level, are not self-sustaining. They typically must be funded through student fees, donations, and sponsorships. But Georgia State University believes that football adds tremendous value in terms of school spirit, identity and media exposure.

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Will the football program be self-sustaining?

Generally football programs on the Football Championship Subdivision level, and even most programs at the Football Bowl Subdivision level, are not self-sustaining. They typically must be funded through student fees, donations, and sponsorships. But Georgia State University believes that football adds tremendous value in terms of school spirit, identity and media exposure.

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What other sports will Georgia State add along with football?

In order to maintain gender equity, Georgia State will add a women’s lacrosse program, beginning in 2010, and the University is currently exploring additional opportunities for women’s sports. The addition of football will NOT lead to the elimination of any men’s sports.

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