Dudley D. (Dude) Draxton (BB 1942-43, 46-48; FB 1947; Tr 1942, 47)
  Draxton a native of Larimore, N.D. was an outstanding athlete, excelling in basketball, football and track. He lettered in basketball 1942-43 and 1946-48; football in 1947 and track in 1942 and again in 1947. His UND career was interrupted by military service in World War II. Dude twice was named to the All North Central Conference team as a basketball guard and there are those who say he was one of the premier guards in the upper midwest during the post WW II era. He once held a great offensive threat, but also excelled as a defensive performer and playmaker. He received his UND degree in education in 1949 and teaching-coaching assignments at high schools followed.

Horace W. (Hoss) Johnson (FB 1936-38; BB; Tr 1936-39)
  Johnson, who came to UND from Cheyenne, Wyo., lettered many times in each sport he participated in. He lettered in football 1936-38, basketball 1936-39 and three times in track 1936-39. Hoss was widely known as an outstanding trackman and ranks among North Dakota's all-time greats in that sport. He was named the Outstanding North Central Conference Athlete in 1937-38. In track he set conference records in the long jump of 23-2 and in the 100-yard dash of 9.7 seconds. He participated in the NCAA meet in 1939, finishing sixth in the 100. Johnson was also an outstanding football player on the same teams such as greats as Evan Lips and Fritz Pollard, both Hall of Famers. He earned his Degree in History in 1939 and later obtained his masters from the University of New Mexico. He served as an army artillery officer and later as a liaison pilot and retired as Lt. Colonel. There is doubt Hoss was one of America's premier athletes during his college days.

Ronald J. Kubesh (FB 1952-54)
  Kubesh is a native of Pine City, Minn., graduated in 1955 with a Mechanical Engineering degree, and lettered four years as an outstanding guard and linebacker under Coach Frank Zazula. He was named to the All North Central Conference team twice, 1953 and1954 and was a starter three straight years, missing less than two minuets of playing time his last three years. In addition to his all conference honors, he was named to the NAIA All America first team and to the Williamson Mid-Bracket All America first team. In 1954 he was UND's Most Valuable Player. Despite a busy schedule he finds time to help out a local high school football team as an assistant coach free of charge. Those who saw him play know he can best be described as being a complete football player and his teammates believe he would rank with any other gridder in the country during his era.

Walter Dobler (FB 1939-41; Tr 1940-42; BB 1941-42)
  Dobler a native of Linton, N.D., was a standout football back, a fine trackman and basketball player. He earned seven letters during his football career, including three in football (1939-41), four in track (1939-42) and one in basketball (1941-42). He was named to the All North Central Conference football team back in 1940. Dobler was described by a former teammate as "one of the finest all around athletes ever developed in North Dakota in the era just before World War II." He was remembered for his tremendous on-the-field exploits, and certainly ranks with some of the greatest backs ever to wear the Green and white of North Dakota. After graduating in 1942 with a Bachelor of Science in Education he entered the service and played some service football and also played pro football with the Hollywood Bears in 1945 and in 1946 with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers. Dobler said, "Attending UND and getting a very fine education gave me a good background for my teaching career. And sports, and my work in the classroom and out, taught me how to meet adversities and overcome them."

Richard G. Koppenhaver (FB 1950-52; BB1950-51)
  Koppenhaver is a native of Grand Fork, whom everyone knows him as either Dick or Kope. He was an excellent Sioux quarterback from 1950 through 1952 under Coach Frank Zazula, earning All Conference honors in 1952 and also serving as team captain that same year. He also lettered in basketball in 1950-51. As an undergraduate student Koppenhaver served on numerous student committees and assisted the letterman's club then and still does now. He graduated from UND in 1954 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Education, and later received his Master's Degree in School Administration in 1961 then later the Doctor of Education Degree, all from UND. After returning back to UND he helped the Athletic Department in many ways. His father Prof. R. D. Koppenhaver was enrolled into the Hall of Fame three years earlier, making the two the only father-son combination in the Hall of Fame.

Curt C. Schave (FB; BB 1928-31; Tr 1929-32)
  Schave, a native of Grand Forks, was an all-star athlete at Grand Forks Central high school. He then enrolled at UND where he lettered in football 1928-30, basketball 1928-31 and track 1929-31. He played on the Sioux championship football, basketball and track teams during the 1928-31 period. During the Glenn (Red) Jarrett era he was a great quarterback and named All Conference back in 1931. He then played on the North Central Conference Championship football teams, and the basketball teams and received numerous other honors. Beside football he was a super basketball player; playing on the late Clem Letich's team. After receiving his degree a Bachelor of Science in Education, he went on to play professional football for the Regina Roughriders and was an outstanding passer there. Schave is remembered as one of the all-time Sioux athlete greats.

Bruce A. Stevenson (BB 1939-42)
  Stevenson is a native of Superior, Wis., and was an outstanding basketball player on teams coached by the late C.W. (Clem) Letich, and earlier Hall of Fame inductee. His UND cage career spanned the era just before World War II. Stevenson was a standout at both ends of the court and he made things happen because of his intensity, ability and his leadership. He lettered three times in basketball, 1939-42, and was named to the All North Central Conference team as a forward and center, which was an honor very few men had achieved. He led UND individual scoring all three seasons he played and was considered by knowledgeable basketball people to be one of the premier players in the midwest during that era.